Monday, June 09, 2014

Winslow Homer and Aldous Huxley

The fun thing about music streaming services is that you can just type something in and, as if by magic, listen to it.  So I just finished listening to a good bit of the first Doors album.  Wow.  I remember hanging out in the attic of my friends Ken and Joe Shelby's house in the summer of 1967 listening to this album on one of those stereos that looked like suitcases til you unfolded it.

Of course, Light My Fire hit me like a ton of bricks.

It would have been fun if you'd written brix there instead of bricks.
Do you think?
I do.
Brix being, roughly, the scientific term for the percentage of sucrose in an aqueous solution?
Exactly.  Would have been a nice link back to that whole Welch's thing.
Do you think?  Welch's is pretty sensitive about the sugar content of their juice.
I do.  Were I a defense attorney I'd say that you opened up the whole Doors slash juice thing in the direct and that I'd like to explore it in the cross.
You would?
Yes.
Really?

All I remember upon first hearing Light My Fire was thinking something like, "Shit!  They're allowed to put all that instrumental stuff in the middle of a rock song?"

Likewise, perhaps five years earlier, I remember the first time my father took me to the National Gallery of Art and showed me Winslow Homer's "Breezin' Up" and thinking something like, "Shit!  They're allowed to just erase stuff and move it around?"

I refer, of course, to the ghost image just to the right of the kid holding the tiller which ended up as the sailboat you see on the far right of the painting.  It was an eye-opener, dear friends.  Like doing mescaline without all the negative side effects.

What does any of this have to do with Aldous Huxley?
Really?

1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I feel the way you do Dear Author. Where I gat all hung up is on the two versions of Wooden Ships--one, of course, by CSN--and the other by Jefferson Airplane--both outstanding.

5:11 AM  

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